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SFHF_Silvermagazine_April_2024_Allergy_LeaderboardThe Westin Nova Scotian Wellness

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One Cerulean Moment
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One Cerulean Moment

I think for one cerulean moment that I might be in heaven but Pauly turns and something in his face goes on and my dad says, hey kiddo, and kicks the third chair out for me.

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Mind

How to deal with digital exhaustion

Wonder why your brain hurts and you feel mentally exhausted at the end of the day? It’s called Digital Exhaustion and it’s more than just being tired from video meetings on Zoom and Teams or Google Meet every day. It has to do with that, but also with cognitive overload. Or more precisely, how our brains deal with attention. If your job entails spending a lot of time in front of a computer and your switching between this, your mobile and maybe a tablet too, this can impact your productivity through attention overload. Think about how you switch and move between apps, emails, video meetings, notifications and periods of multitasking and focused work. This is called temporal attention, it’s when we’re paying attention to things that are happening, such as emails and video meetings or phone calls. When we’re out and about, working out, hiking or walking and even moving

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Mind

Mental Health for the Holidays

COVID-19 changed our predictable routines, necessitating remote work arrangements, physical distancing, and wearing masks. Everything from shopping to attending sports and social events now necessitates planning. Add workload, traffic congestion, home schooling, and alcohol to the mix and you have a sure-fire recipe for frayed nerves and lost tempers. According to a Canadian Association for Mental Health survey of 1000 adults in March 2021, 20.9 per cent of respondents indicated moderate to severe anxiety levels, 20.1 per cent reported feeling depressed, and 21.3 percent reported feelings of loneliness. Mental health and addictions admissions in Nova Scotia Health Central Zone more than doubled between April – June 2020 (191) and April -June 2021 (458). These mental pressures often worsen during the Holiday Season as people try to maintain family traditions, shop for gifts, and socialize at home and at work. As waiting lists for mental health treatment are often years long,

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Health

Dementia research and what we’re learning

Dementia, such as Alzheimers, is of top concern for Canadians as they age and for their parents, especially those in their 50’s and dealing with aging parents. A recent study by Baycrest a teaching hospital in Toronto, found Canadians are unsure about available resources for them and their parents and find it difficult to get the right information. The study also found that less than one in five people are confident about their knowledge in preventing dementia. One in four Canadians over 45 don’t know when to start taking steps to prevent dementia and only 16% of study respondents indicated having any type of plan ion place to deal with it. “Almost 80 per cent of our long-term care residents are living with dementia. Through Baycrest’s ground-breaking research and innovations, compassionate care and renowned educational programs, we are striving to take critical steps forward in paving the way towards a

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Mind

The power of therapeutic writing

No, we’re not talking about a gratefulness journal or a daily affirmations journal either. This about using some different writing techniques to help deal with a trauma in life, or when in a difficult time period. And fortunately, it doesn’t mean having to relive that trauma either. That said, it can open fresh wounds that haven’t been fully treated, so if you have a recent experience, it may be worth it to wait a little longer. ‘I hear and I forget, I see and I remember, I write and I understand.’ Chinese Proverb A study in the British Journal of General Practice found that “expressive writing” or “therapeutic writing” helped patients in several ways, from decreasing stress and anxiety to improving breathing and reducing chronic pain from issues such as Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS.) Therapeutic writing also helped reduce physical symptoms of people with breast, colorectal and prostate cancer. A

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Mind

Importance of Seasonal Self-Care

The days are getting shorter, the summer heat is cooling off: fall is coming! For many of us, fall is associated with new routines and plans being put into action. What better time to commit to a self-care routine? What is “self-care”? Self-care is any activity we do to support our happiness, wellness, and health. We simply cannot function on empty. Regular practice helps us stay grounded during life’s inevitable ups and downs. A self-care routine Self-care is an individual practice. Finding out what works for you will take some discovery. For one person, self-care might mean attending a yoga class once a week and schedule in time for journaling each night before bed. I recommend starting a list of activities you love doing most. These activities should make you feel centred, happy, or contribute to your sense of wellness. Creative arts, spending time in nature, and exercising are all

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Mind

The science behind laughing

Laughter boosts immunity, mental health, learning and more. Seriously. Exercise, sleep, diet and stress-management are critical for immunity. But there’s a lesser known way you can boost your health (plus a whole lot of other things). In these uncertain times, laughing yourself silly may just be a smart thing to do. The science of laughter—though still preliminary—suggests that it has benefits for our health and psychological well-being. Here are just five examples from this emerging research: Physical Health. A review of the existing research suggests that humor and laughter may boost immune function.  Another study found that even just anticipating a funny event decreases potentially detrimental stress-related hormones. In another study, laughter was found to lower stress and inflammation and increase good cholesterol.  Mental Health. Laughter is wonderful for stress relief.  A review of research on laughter therapies suggests they can reduce anxiety, depression and perceived stress. Laughter makes you

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Mind

Train your brain like an Olympian

Jean François Ménard’s new book teaches us how to have an Olympian mentality at work. You’re training some of the country’s elite athletes. Within that inner circle, there is a technical coach, a strength and conditioning coach to train their body, a physical therapist, chiropractor, nutritionist, and a mental-performance coach. Being a part of that inner circle is a huge responsibility considering that when an athlete reaches an elite level, what separates the winners from the rest of the field isn’t their physical preparation but how well they build that brain muscle strength and call upon it when their performance hits a curve. Like any coach in this arena, you’ve put in the work and navigated your way successfully at various international competitions – World Cups, Pan American Games, Commonwealth Games, etc. Each event is getting you closer to the holy grail – the Olympics. For the first time in

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