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SFHF_SilverMagazine_March_2024_Detox_LeaderboardThe Westin Nova Scotian Wellness

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Longevity

The hottest erogenous zones

When most of us think of sex, we think of the physical part first. But sexual pleasure can be drawn from many sources and experiences. Physical touch feels good. We all know that. But did you know it is also essential to human growth and survival? Some of the potential benefits of affection include lower blood pressure, an increase in oxytocin, a reduction in stress hormones, pain alleviation, heightened immunity, and lower levels of anxiety. Physical touch activates regions of the brain associated with thought and emotion. It lowers both heart rate and blood pressure and increases levels of oxytocin, the feel-good chemical associated with bonding.   And the benefits of physical touch flow in both directions—to the giver and receiver. A study found that when women touch their partners as a sign of support, there is more activity in their own ventral striatum, a region associated with reward processing. As

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Longevity

Love love

My mother was an actress. She wore capes – long ones that billowed behind her as if they were motorized – and when she was still, they landed on the floor in beautiful puddles. Her jewellery – big and colourful like planets – exuded a shimmer of sitar-like music which narrowed into a single coke-bottle note in the evenings. Andy Warhol designed a pair of earrings for her. They looked like two ruins that had been pulled from the earth, but when she wore them – I don’t know what to tell you – something out of this world happened and I’ll just leave it at that. When she hugged me, her perfume stayed with me all day, bloomed when I shook my head, and when she was away, I’d dab it hot behind my ears the way she did behind hers. I waited for it to wear off a

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Longevity

We all deserve happiness

While we mainly look at Yoga in the west as a source of exercise that additionally makes us feel calm and centered, there are many ways to practice Yoga off the mat that don’t involve movement at all. In saying this, please know I continue to value and promote physical exercise – we must keep our bodies strong and mobile for our overall health and wellbeing.  Yoga is the 6,000 year-old science of the mind and is experienced as a stilling of our thoughts, or ending the ceaseless chatter in our minds. A revered Yoga sage and guru from 1450 BCE by the name of Patanjali explains that reaching this quiet space in the mind is done through non-attachment and practice. Practice, in reference to the eight limbs of Yoga which includes: social and personal ethics, physical poses, breathwork and meditation. However, I find the concept of non-attachment powerful. That

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Longevity

Boomers and the dating game

Connection is key to health and well-being. With one-third of boomers currently single, it might be time to get back on the proverbial horse. Margaret Sampson hasn’t been on an actual date in almost 35 years – not since she was 21. She wants to find a partner, but has no idea where to start. “My marriage ended and although it wasn’t perfect, it was comfortable,” she says. “The idea of dating again feels daunting. Do I even know how to do it still?” Her situation is not unique. Let’s face it – sometimes life doesn’t pan out. People grow apart, illness happens. Or maybe life has passed you by and that special someone hasn’t surfaced yet. There are many reasons people find themselves single at an unexpected age. Whatever the circumstances, more and more people are finding themselves single after 50, so if you are lonely, you are certainly not alone.

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Longevity

Sex and ageing: What you need to know

As women age, sexual desire may diminish—or not. It’s a different game, but you can still win. Do you feel sexy? Do you want to have sex? These are not the same question. This is, of course, true for people at any age. The way we act on how we feel is only one part of our sexuality. Sexuality incorporates our attitude towards our bodies, beliefs, values, gender, orientation, relationships and desires. For instance, the desire for intimate physical contact waxes and wanes over time, dependent as much on hormones as our life situations. Sex drive may walk out the door when we are depressed, angry, having financial difficulty or trouble with a partner. Some people were never very interested in the first place; others are sorry to see desire diminish with age. However, the death of desire as we age is not at all the rule. According to a

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Longevity

Tap into your sexual fantasies

Talking about and playing out fantasies (even in small doses) can keep sex exciting in long-term relationships. If you have difficulty tapping into your seduction fantasies, look for other sources of inspiration. Ask you lover(s) and friends to share their stories and fantasies. Read erotic fiction or think about some of the ways you’ve responded to sex and seduction scenes you’ve read about in books or seen on screen. You may also want to consider if your beliefs or the feelings you associate with sex (e.g., shame) are stymieing your fantasies.  Ditch the guilt You need not feel guilty about your sexual fantasies—what- ever they entail. Even if your fantasies fall outside the boundaries of your real-life relationships, they can improve the quality of your sex life and deepen connection. Not only do your fantasies help you to learn more about yourself (and your partner, if you share and discuss),

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Longevity

Great sex after 50

A healthy and satisfying sex life doesn’t need to be a distant memory. Sexual pleasure and intimacy contribute to physical and psychological health and wellbeing, no matter your age.  Sex boosts your immune system, slashes stress, lowers blood pressure, helps you get better sleep, improves heart health, and decreases rates of depression and anxiety.  Plus, it’s fun. At a deeper level, sexual activity is associated with greater enjoyment of life, according to a 2018 UK study of nearly 7,000 people aged 50 to 89, published in the Journal of Sexual Medicine.  Researchers found men and women who reported engaging in sexual activity in the past year also experienced a higher enjoyment of life than those who were not sexually active.  Redefining sexual intimacy Although both men and women associate frequent kissing, petting, or fondling with their level of wellbeing, only men associate regular penetrative intercourse (at least twice a month)

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