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December 31, 2019

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Longevity

10 Tips for living happy in 2020

According to the World Happiness Report in 2019, Canada is the 9th happiest in the world. So, not only are we polite! We’re generally happy. But let’s face it, with the state of global politics and the seemingly angry world of social media, it can seem hard to be happy! Well, we folks over 48, we’re resilient and we’ve been through a lot! 2020 is the start of a new decade and there’s lots to be happy about. So we’ve made a list of ten ways to be happier in 2020. Top 10 Happiness Tips for 2020 Finding time for you: with work, family and other commitments, finding time for ourselves can be hard. But it’s critical to helping keep your brain healthy. Carve out a little time each week to do something just for you. You’ll be happier and others around you will also benefit. Get outdoors! Research is

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Health

Antibiotic usage linked with increase risk of rheumatoid arthritis

A new study found that the odds of developing RA is 60% higher in those exposed to antibiotics than those who are not. Researchers from Keele University and the Quadram Institute in the UK analyzed data from primary care medical records and found that the odds of developing rheumatoid arthritis is 60% higher in those exposed to antibiotics than in those not exposed. The researchers also found that the odds increased with the number of antibiotics treatments, and how recently they were taken. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) affects roughly 300,000 Canadians, and this study suggests it affects 26 in 100,000 people who have taken antibiotics. RA is likely to be caused by a complex mix of genetics and different environmental factors, so this study isn’t reason to stop taking antibiotics when they are needed. But it does open up a new door of exploration to finding the triggers, which could be

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Health

Finding the root cause of pain

“The closer one is able to get to the root cause and resolve it, the more likely it is to find a cure or significant long-term pain relief,” says Dr. Ko. Like Dietrich Klinghardt, MD, originator of this Four-Component theory in treating chronic disease, he asks the patient, “What was happening at the very beginning of the pain problem?” This often gives clues about the area to focus on. For example, structural causes of low back pain include car accidents, falls, collision sports and traumatic childbirth. These often lead to strained sacroiliac joint ligaments, which Dr. Ko treats with Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) injections. Biochemical causes include Celiac disease (gluten sensitivity—only 50% of patients have bowel complaints), hidden infections such as Lyme disease, and exposure to toxins such as pesticides on a farm or golf course, heavy metals and solvents. Psychological problems include post-traumatic stress disorder (a screening question is to

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